Category Archives: DOCUMENTARY

Memory from PAST

 

hmm,  very interesting……

                                   Camping out in 1918.  (even brought along a slop pail)

This couple pose in an early version of American Gothic, with a groundhog killed on their Manchester farm. It’s dinner!

Note: Photo taken circa 1914, from a family photo album.

Standing over one of her many trophy mule deer, subsistence-and-sport huntress “Gusty” Wallihan appears every inch the frontier matron with her dressy bonnet, prairie-pattern cartridge belt, floral-em broidered gauntlets, hunting knife, and Remington-Hepburn rifle.  1895

At least this one won’t be quite as dangerous as the old single wheeled models. Look in the trailer over the back wheel.  They have their baby in there!

This was the approved way to change the street lamps in 1910.  Cool!

A single Paddy Wagon.  Never knew they had such a vehicle!  This is way cool.

                                                  Here is an early motorhome, built in 1926. 

This is a travel tent accessory  built in 1910.

These are vintage treadmills in the 1920’s.

This is a 1920’s refrigerator. Only the elite could afford such a thing, and most still had the old ice boxes.This is a 1920’s refrigerator. Only the elite could afford such a thing, and most still had the old ice boxes.

 

A hair dryer in the 1920 Salon.  What a contraption!

Chester E. Macduffee next to his newly patented, 250 kilo diving suit, 1911

A postcard from the 1800’s advertising a knife throwing act with the traveling circus.

A Strongwoman balances a piano and the pianist on her chest.  1920

London, in the 1920’s, this was a telephone engineer.  What a job!

garbowski.net

 

Did you know our leaders were this creative during WWII.

This is the first I’d heard of this. Additionally we also took other defensive steps to protect our war production capability from both Japanese and German attack. For instance in the Greater Buffalo, New York area there were several steel making facilities, iron foundries & chemical plants. All of these were critical to the war effort and all of them had many antiaircraft batteries manned by US Army troops around the clock.On the east & west coasts and in the Gulf of Mexico we had antisubmarine nets, manned barrage balloons & coastal artillery batteries & spotters. We also deployed Coast Guard & Naval assets in the St. Lawrence and Great Lakes to protect war related commence of raw materials to the steel and iron making industries.

Hidden  in Plain View

During  WW II Lockheed (unbelievable 1940s pictures). This is a version of  special effects during the 1940’s. I have never seen these pictures or  knew that we had gone this far to protect ourselves. During World War II  the Army Corps of Engineers needed to hide the Lockheed Burbank Aircraft  Plant to protect it from a possible Japanese air attack. They covered it  with camouflage netting to make it look like a rural subdivision from  the air.

Before….

1 After..
2The person that provided  these pictures said she got an interesting story about someone’s mother  who worked at Lockheed, and she as a younger child, remembers all  this.  She says that to this day, these are the first pictures of  it she’s seen. 
3 Another person who lived  in the area talked about as being a boy, watching it all be set up like  a movie studio production.  They had fake houses, trees, etc. and  moved parked cars around so it looked like a residential area from the  skies overhead.
4I lived  in  North Long Beach   during  World War II, I was 13 years old. (1940)  The Long Beach airport  was  near Lakewood , CA .  There was a large Boeing Plant there.  If you would drive  down Carson  St. going south you could drive under  the camouflage  netting.     Ed Pollard 

5I am 85 and had much of my pilot training  in Calif.    I  have been under this net and have seen it from the air.  During  preflight training I rode a bus under the net and was very surprised as  I didn’t know it was there.  It was strong enough to walk on and  they hired people to ride bicycles and move around as if they lived  there to make it look  authentic.  Warren  Holmgreen  Jr
67 8Hiding the Lockheed Plant  during World War II – wow this is  amazing!

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